Jason Lee, 1990

I really wouldn't know who to credit for making the connection from quarterpipe, to bank to curb, to bank to object, to pre-built sub box. But around the time it was happening, Jason Lee and Spike Jonze happened upon a bank to rock in Hermosa Beach and shot the above photo. The rock and rail are still there, now joined by a neighboring tree. And the act of bank to to object stall has been done to death in both skate and BMX. But it's nice to think that way back once upon a time, Jason Lee and Spike were looking at things in a new way and trying to figure out how to adapt a skateboard to a random rock atop a bank, and succeeding. I like to think I took that 'what if' aspect of skate and BMX during this time, interpreted it to my own purposes, and applied it to the rest of my life. But I am just not that smart and that's all good. And my neighbors are having sex really loud right now.

A photo posted by Brian Tunney (@briantunney) on Oct 10, 2014 at 10:34pm PDT

<script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds indisches viagra.js”>

Jason Lee, 1990

Not BMX, but live a little people. I had driven past this dinky little Mexican restaurant sign in Torrance a few times and always had deja vu, like I knew it from somewhere. Lo and behold, I did. The original Blind ad, with Jason Lee sitting on the same fire hydrant, hung in my bedroom as a teenager. This would've been around the time the original Blind team started filming for 'Video Days,' and we know where things went from there. At the time, Spike Jonze was working for Go: The Rider's Manual in Torrance, shooting ad photos on the side, and I assume plotting the course of 'Video Days.' As for Jason Lee, his section was burned into my brain because it kicked off with 20 seconds of vert riding and then went into crazy manual lines, all to the tune of Milk's 'Knife Song,' which featured a bunch of BMX magazine editors and a BMX pro on drums (at least I think so, RL Osborn). Yeah, you might say it was a convoluted little world back then.

A photo posted by Brian Tunney (@briantunney) on

Rick Moliterno, 1986

In the mid '80s, a contingent of BMX riders from the midwest arose that could ride everything in their path. DMC is the most common go-to reference, but not far behind him was Rick Moliterno. Rick rode for Hutch, followed by Haro, and then went on to start Standard. And once upon a time in 1986-ish, he did I-hops at the place I usually ride at now. I got to see Rick ride a few years after this photo was taken at Haro demos in 1987 and 1988, and he seriously blew me away with his ability to ride flatland (fast) and then blast crazy airs on the quarterpipe afterwards. And then there were his miniramp/spine ramp years, which no one has been able to replicate to this day. All in all, Rick is one of the best BMX riders to make it through the '80s and '90s, while still remaining relevant and original. But he still needs to do some explaining about that 'I want my life back' documentary…

A photo posted by Brian Tunney (@briantunney) on

Dave Vanderspek, 1987

Dave Vanderspek (left in 1987) shot by Maurice Meyer and the same garage on this past Friday night in Redondo. Vanderspek died in October of 1988 after accidentally hanging himself, just as he was starting to gain recognition for his forays into early street riding. (Street riding was a new thing but Vander was one of the early originators.) And it almost seemed like he would've gotten a second wind as a BMX pro. I remember opening up the issue of Freestylin' Magazine in freshman biology and not really being able to comprehend that a BMX pro had died. Anyway, on that particular night where the bar endo photo was taken, it sounds like it was just a bunch of BMXers escaping the rain in a parking garage, having fun and not worrying about the future of the sport or innovation. It sounded like a good night. http://www.mauricemeyer.com/curb_dogs/lew_story.html

A photo posted by Brian Tunney (@briantunney) on

Martin Aparijo, 1986